Grand Junction says “No” on all proposed municipal ballot issues

Ballot issues 2A, 2B, and 2C have all been left on the cutting room floor
Published: Nov. 9, 2022 at 4:26 PM MST
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GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. (KJCT) – Grand Junction had three measures on the ballot Tuesday night, and the citizens of the valley have decided which to keep and which to leave. Voters chose to leave measures 2A, 2B, and 2C on the political cutting room floor. None of the proposed ballot issues received enough votes to pass.

Measure 2A would have increased lodging taxes in Grand Junction by applying a one percent tax to the city’s lodging tax and a one percent tax on the price paid for lodging in the city. The measure’s text says that the money will be used for “initiatives that facilitate the development of partnerships among non-profits, the private sector, and government … to provide affordable housing for households making 80% or less than the area’s median income.”

The measure was defeated in a landslide, with 62 percent voting no and 38 percent voting yes.

Measure 2A was defeated in a landslide, with 63 percent of Grand Junction voters choosing no.
Measure 2A was defeated in a landslide, with 63 percent of Grand Junction voters choosing no.(Kacie Sinton)

Measure 2B would have seen an increase in municipal taxes for short-term rental accommodations in the city. According to the measure’s text on the ballot, it would then have directed the money collected from short-term rental taxes towards providing affordable housing for residents making less than 80 percent of the area’s median income.

The measure was defeated in a landslide, with 73 percent voting no and 27 percent voting yes.

Measure 2B was defeated in a landslide, with 74 percent of Grand Junction voters choosing no.
Measure 2B was defeated in a landslide, with 74 percent of Grand Junction voters choosing no.(Kacie Sinton)

Measure 2C would have amended Article 14, Section 124 of the city charter. This amendment would have increased the maximum lease term for city-owned property from 25 years to 99 years when used for affordable housing projects.

The measure was narrowly defeated, with 51 percent voting no and 49 percent voting yes.

Measure 2C was narrowly defeated, with just 52 percent of voters choosing no.
Measure 2C was narrowly defeated, with just 52 percent of voters choosing no.(Kacie Sinton)