Colorado law enforcement seized more Fentanyl in the first five months of 2022 than all of 2021

Fentanyl is extremely dangerous, with a lethal dose that can shift depending on a number of...
Fentanyl is extremely dangerous, with a lethal dose that can shift depending on a number of factors.(DEA | DEA)
Published: Jun. 6, 2022 at 11:50 AM MDT
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GOLDEN, Colo. (KJCT) - Most Coloradans are all too familiar with the Fentanyl crisis sweeping the nation, with communities rocked by steadily increasing overdose rates. During a press conference at the Colorado State Patrol headquarters in Golden, Colorado, law enforcement announced that they have already seized more illegally-obtained Fentanyl in just the first five months of 2022 than all of 2021. Officers presented data collected from the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, revealing that more than two million individual doses of Fentanyl were confiscated in Colorado.

While the amount of Fentanyl removed from Colorado is substantial, Colorado State Patrol Chief Col. Matthew Packard said that they had a lot more work to do. “What we remove is a drop in the ocean. It’s cheap, it’s everywhere, including a strong counterfeit market where people think they are taking other forms of pills,” Packard added.

Keith Weis, the executive director of the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program, provided some explanation into how law enforcement targets areas experiencing Fentanyl surges and deals with them. “When we analyze the data that indicates increases in drug seizures and dramatic rises in fatal overdoses, it becomes alarmingly apparent that the user market for illicit Fentanyl in the state is expanding,” said Weis. “To save lives, a unified response between public safety and health professionals will be essential to counter this dangerous trend.”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, Colorado State Troopers, and several other local and state agencies are involved in the lengthy process of controlling the Fentanyl epidemic in Colorado.

Tips on recognizing an overdose are available here, and an interactive map for finding Naloxone can be found here. Naloxone is a medication that can prevent an overdose from becoming fatal by attaching to opioid receptors to block and reverse the effects of an overdose.

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